March & Rally For Scottish Independence. Edinburgh: 21st September 2013

Ill be there - will you?http://www.independencerally.com Heres an article (from Newsnet Scotland) by George Kerevan on his reasons for joining the march:....Tomorrow IÕll be in Edinburgh to join the march and rally for Scottish independence, ending with the traditional speeches on Calton Hill after one oÕclock.Last yearÕs march took place in bright sunshine and was cheerful, energetic and positive. This year, the weather forecast is cloudy, and that includes the opinion polls. These have not moved in the past 12 months, with a plurality of those intending to vote saying No, and about a third saying Yes. So why am I marching?Firstly, because I was born into a nation without a state to run its own affairs or cure its own ills Ð economic and social. Ills there were and still are. My parentÕs generation had to emigrate to survive as ScotlandÕs heavy industries collapsed from lack of investment and nationalisation of their management in far-off London. Even in the 1960s more than 100,000 people a year Ð mostly the young and skilled Ð had to leave to find work. Today, youth unemployment in Scotland, though marginally lower than the UK average, is back to an unacceptable 21.6 per cent.The Unionist camp will reply: with devolution, Scotland can run its own internal affairs and still enjoy the benefits of collective solidarity with the rest of the UK. Could these be the same Unionists Ð Tories and Labour Ð who opposed devolution every step of the political way? Like the Labour back-benchers who sabotaged the 1979 devolution referendum with their bogus 40 per cent rule, leaving Scotland naked before Thatcher?True, Scotland now has a modicum of devolution but every scrap of local democracy was conceded grudgingly in an attempt to thwart the SNP and delay genuine political autonomy. Nothing has changed in this regard. The big three Unionist parties are each offering vague promises of greater devolution of tax and economic powers if there is a No vote next September. But they pointedly refused to put Devo Max on the referendum ballot. DonÕt they trust the Scottish people?Of course they donÕt, which is why we need to rid ourselves of being run from Westminster with its MPs who fiddle their expenses and its silly pantomime debates Ð debates made pointless because the Downing Street executive has seized all power and reduced the House of Commons to a talking shop. Even if you want more devolution rather than independence, the only way to get it is to vote Yes next September. This is the only thing that will get LondonÕs attention.IÕll also be marching tomorrow because I know, even with devolution, economic power is still concentrated in London Ð with disastrous effect. I listened to former Chancellor Alistair Darling on the radio this week telling us that an independent Scotland could not have bailed out RBS in 2009. Is this the same Alistair Darling (along with Gordon Brown) on whose watch RBS was allowed to fail because of lax regulation? It was the UK that imploded economically in 2009 under Labour and Westminster control Ð not Scotland. And Darling was chancellor when it happened.IÕll be marching tomorrow to remind Scots that as an independent nation they could have responded to the financial crisis like tiny Iceland, which jailed its errant bankers, refused to use taxpayerÕs cash to repay private investors (which is what Darling did when he ÒsavedÓ the banks), and rebooted its economy successfully because it had control over its own economic destiny.IÕll be marching because Ð trapped inside the UK Ð Scottish economic growth has been consistently below the UK average since the Second World War. As a result, we have been denied the correct taxation policy and interest rates needed to encourage local investment and entrepreneurship. Scotland requires freedom to set its own tax and interest rates Not to engage in a beggar-thy-neighbour race to the bottom against England, but to ensure fiscal and monetary policies fit domestic needs.IÕll be marching because IÕm fed up being told Scotland will fail on its own and needs the ÒinsuranceÓ of being part of the UK. Open your eyes: the traditional social democratic community beloved by Scots of all classes is being dismantled piece by piece in England by the Tory-Lib Dem coalition. The old UK welfare state Ð itself a result of mass pressure from below after Second World War Ð is a thing of the past.The NHS in England is already semi-privatised. The introduction of student fees down south will marketise university education, splitting it between upper class finishing schools and working class polytechnics Ð the antithesis of ScotlandÕs egalitarian approach to education. The ideal of universal welfare benefits was destroyed by New Labour. But the worst spending cuts are pencilled in for after the 2015 UK general election: the only way for the next Westminster government to make the books balance is to savage whatÕs left of welfare entitlements. If you want to retain a social democratic community in Scotland then you had better march with me on Saturday.IÕll also be marching to Calton Hill Ð rain, hail or shine Ð because IÕm an internationalist and want Scotland to join the world. The Unionists argue that Scotland is more influential as part of the UK? Really? UK governments have isolated themselves inside the EU by their constant negativity yet have not had the courage to withdraw from membership. How is this influence? Besides, invading Iraq effectively destroyed BritainÕs diplomatic credibility in the world.Finally, IÕll be marching because I want Scotland to grow up and take responsibility for its own destiny. Do I have an answer to every last question about what might happen if Scotland becomes independent? Grow up: no one has. If you want a comfort blanket, hang on to London.Except that, by the decadeÕs end, Westminster will have taken away that welfare comfort blanket entirely. Instead, you will be living in a dog-eat-dog Britain still dominated by rich London bankers. And mendacious Westminster politicians who give not a fig for Scotland except as voting fodder for LabourÕs invisible back-bench MPs. http://rx.hu/g164

Comments

  • Ill be there - will you?http://www.independencerally.com Heres an article (from Newsnet Scotland) by George Kerevan on his reasons for joining the march:....Tomorrow IÕll be in Edinburgh to join the march and rally for Scottish independence, ending with the traditional speeches on Calton Hill after one oÕclock.Last yearÕs march took place in bright sunshine and was cheerful, energetic and positive. This year, the weather forecast is cloudy, and that includes the opinion polls. These have not moved in the past 12 months, with a plurality of those intending to vote saying No, and about a third saying Yes. So why am I marching?Firstly, because I was born into a nation without a state to run its own affairs or cure its own ills Ð economic and social. Ills there were and still are. My parentÕs generation had to emigrate to survive as ScotlandÕs heavy industries collapsed from lack of investment and nationalisation of their management in far-off London. Even in the 1960s more than 100,000 people a year Ð mostly the young and skilled Ð had to leave to find work. Today, youth unemployment in Scotland, though marginally lower than the UK average, is back to an unacceptable 21.6 per cent.The Unionist camp will reply: with devolution, Scotland can run its own internal affairs and still enjoy the benefits of collective solidarity with the rest of the UK. Could these be the same Unionists Ð Tories and Labour Ð who opposed devolution every step of the political way? Like the Labour back-benchers who sabotaged the 1979 devolution referendum with their bogus 40 per cent rule, leaving Scotland naked before Thatcher?True, Scotland now has a modicum of devolution but every scrap of local democracy was conceded grudgingly in an attempt to thwart the SNP and delay genuine political autonomy. Nothing has changed in this regard. The big three Unionist parties are each offering vague promises of greater devolution of tax and economic powers if there is a No vote next September. But they pointedly refused to put Devo Max on the referendum ballot. DonÕt they trust the Scottish people?Of course they donÕt, which is why we need to rid ourselves of being run from Westminster with its MPs who fiddle their expenses and its silly pantomime debates Ð debates made pointless because the Downing Street executive has seized all power and reduced the House of Commons to a talking shop. Even if you want more devolution rather than independence, the only way to get it is to vote Yes next September. This is the only thing that will get LondonÕs attention.IÕll also be marching tomorrow because I know, even with devolution, economic power is still concentrated in London Ð with disastrous effect. I listened to former Chancellor Alistair Darling on the radio this week telling us that an independent Scotland could not have bailed out RBS in 2009. Is this the same Alistair Darling (along with Gordon Brown) on whose watch RBS was allowed to fail because of lax regulation? It was the UK that imploded economically in 2009 under Labour and Westminster control Ð not Scotland. And Darling was chancellor when it happened.IÕll be marching tomorrow to remind Scots that as an independent nation they could have responded to the financial crisis like tiny Iceland, which jailed its errant bankers, refused to use taxpayerÕs cash to repay private investors (which is what Darling did when he ÒsavedÓ the banks), and rebooted its economy successfully because it had control over its own economic destiny.IÕll be marching because Ð trapped inside the UK Ð Scottish economic growth has been consistently below the UK average since the Second World War. As a result, we have been denied the correct taxation policy and interest rates needed to encourage local investment and entrepreneurship. Scotland requires freedom to set its own tax and interest rates Not to engage in a beggar-thy-neighbour race to the bottom against England, but to ensure fiscal and monetary policies fit domestic needs.IÕll be marching because IÕm fed up being told Scotland will fail on its own and needs the ÒinsuranceÓ of being part of the UK. Open your eyes: the traditional social democratic community beloved by Scots of all classes is being dismantled piece by piece in England by the Tory-Lib Dem coalition. The old UK welfare state Ð itself a result of mass pressure from below after Second World War Ð is a thing of the past.The NHS in England is already semi-privatised. The introduction of student fees down south will marketise university education, splitting it between upper class finishing schools and working class polytechnics Ð the antithesis of ScotlandÕs egalitarian approach to education. The ideal of universal welfare benefits was destroyed by New Labour. But the worst spending cuts are pencilled in for after the 2015 UK general election: the only way for the next Westminster government to make the books balance is to savage whatÕs left of welfare entitlements. If you want to retain a social democratic community in Scotland then you had better march with me on Saturday.IÕll also be marching to Calton Hill Ð rain, hail or shine Ð because IÕm an internationalist and want Scotland to join the world. The Unionists argue that Scotland is more influential as part of the UK? Really? UK governments have isolated themselves inside the EU by their constant negativity yet have not had the courage to withdraw from membership. How is this influence? Besides, invading Iraq effectively destroyed BritainÕs diplomatic credibility in the world.Finally, IÕll be marching because I want Scotland to grow up and take responsibility for its own destiny. Do I have an answer to every last question about what might happen if Scotland becomes independent? Grow up: no one has. If you want a comfort blanket, hang on to London.Except that, by the decadeÕs end, Westminster will have taken away that welfare comfort blanket entirely. Instead, you will be living in a dog-eat-dog Britain still dominated by rich London bankers. And mendacious Westminster politicians who give not a fig for Scotland except as voting fodder for LabourÕs invisible back-bench MPs. http://rx.hu/g164
  • Having previously been a Marxist, a Labour Party member and a failed SNP candidate, does anyone (even George) know who Kerevan supports today?
  • Enjoy your day out. I believe they are rounding up a few of the old faithful fiesty si gers for the frolicsome fun.
  • As well as rounding up the numbers supposedly attending?Have the organisers announced yet what tomorrows crowd will number?
  • It will be like Countdown. They will decide on a final number and then add, subtract, multiply and otherwise manipulate the calculations. Just as they do with the projected economic forecast for an Independent Scotland.;-)
  • Whilst setting aside an as yet undisclosed sum to re-privatise Royal Mail?
  • Statler and Waldorf - alive and well :-)
  • Heres former BBC broadcaster Derek Bateman:Generation XThere was an eccentric bloke at the Glasgow Herald many years ago who confused me by changing his style every time I saw him. Collar and tie one day then tee shirt to work; one day pony tail, next day not. One of the hacks summed him up: ÒHe opens the wardrobe in the morning, looks along the hangers and selects a persona for the day.Ó He came to mind when I heard a Yes voter say the referendum isnÕt about identity, a view supported by the No side who complain about a false choice between Scottish and British. What do they mean? I get the bit about inclusionÉthat your place of birth, antecedents, colour, culture and beliefs are no exclusion. I live in Kelvinbridge which is one of the most multi cultural places IÕve known. The connections of people I meet, excluding other BritsÉ. NO! SorryÉNOT excluding other Brits. ThatÕs not what I meant. IÕll rephrase. Counting all nationalities, with English, Welsh and Irish folk Ð North and South Ð included, there is a constantly changing United Nations of North Africa, West Africa, South Africa, Kosovo, the sub continent (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh), Germany, France, Iceland, Canada, Spain, Korea, Iran, Iraq and Govan. ThatÕs before we count the Polish contingent and the annual influx of foreign students. Not only do I not exclude them from my view of my country, I wholeheartedly embrace them being here. Immigrants, asylum seeks, refugees Ð welcome. Few things make me as proud as knowing that when persecution gets intolerable, a beaten-down and crushed human thinks of my country as a refuge. If they are here and their heart is here, then they are Scots like me. That means they have invested in this place, brought their skills, humanity and commitment and put them at the service of all. They are doing their bit. Just like me.So I donÕt worry that in being Scottish I am somehow against others. I donÕt resent anyone from England. Well, not because theyÕre English! I am English on my motherÕs side and a childhood spent partly in the Newcastle area has ingrained in me a love of the working class warmth and camaraderie of the North. And oh those accents.But IÕm a Scot. Whatever my feelings towards others, IÕm not confused about my identity. I am Scottish. Yes, I know IÕm a British subject with a passport but I canÕt avoid that. It was inherited. As many have said before, whatever it says on my UK records, I am a Scot where it matters Ð in my heart. And thatÕs where it ties in to the immigrant community because that is their option too, to regard themselves as Scots and their home as Scotland. As my mother came here with her accent, her Methodism, her different ways and Yorkshire puddings (family tradition), so new arrivals bring their distinct self-image and traditions too.It just isnÕt an issue, having a multiple identity as countless Irish folk in Scotland can testify. You can have both if thatÕs your choice Ð Pakistani and Scottish.But the question in the referendum does require a choice. It is in essence asking who you are because it is inherent in the preference of status you choose for your country. When presented with the option, it is the clearest expression of nationality to choose statehood. To deliberately decline to do so is to downgrade your nationality.The question asks, assuming you see yourself as a Scot, if you want your country to have the full range of government powers to run its own affairs and acquire the internationally acknowledged status of independence. In other words, do you aspire to be like every other member in the United Nations where all nationalities take their place as normal sovereign countries? Or, do you prefer to think of your country as Britain in which Scotland plays a subsidiary part as a regionally-administered province subject to policies largely decided for the needs of a majority based elsewhere? (By a parliamentary system in which Scotland now has 4 per cent representation) A No vote accepts Scotland has subservient status in a larger entity and while there may be advantages to that arrangement, in order to receive those benefits, it is necessary to concede secondary status to your own country. By doing so, you acknowledge the superior status of Britain over Scotland. By voting No you make Britain, not Scotland, your country of choice.No other people do this. It would be unthinkable for, letÕs say, an Australian to spend more than a nano second on it. A politician in Canberra suggesting Australia couldnÕt handle its own affairs and should let London decide monetary policy, defence and foreign affairs would be a laughing stock. Would a Frenchman or German put European government ahead of their own? I am a European first and a Frenchman second would be ridiculed even in pro Europe France.Your double identity may be confirmed by a No vote but for the first time in our lifetimes and in the existence of the Union we will have been confronted with the choice and you will have chosen the UK over Scotland. In a No voterÕs mind, the UK is the preferred country. Of course you retain a Scottish identity but only within the context of the UK.It surely means your belief in Scotland and the Scots is compromised. Your Scottishness is expressed in limited terms. You are saying you are Scottish but only up to the point where you have to choose between Scotland and Britain. Then you opt for the UK.So in terms of identity, that decision makes you a Brit first and a Scot second. How could it be otherwise? Asked to endorse the globally accepted credentials of nationhood, you will have declined, downgrading your country Ð Scotland Ð to provincial status.In Scotland we have muddled along seemingly forever fudging the issue of who we are and what our country is. We say to ourselves we are Scottish and British Ð best of both worlds Ð and weÕve got away with it, although I suspect it has engendered in us a dispiriting inferiority complex or at least a cringe-worthy confusion alien to every other nationality.In a yearÕs time that fudge, that awkward compromise, wonÕt do. We are the generation who get to choose. We are Generation X. And choose we must. There is no hiding place.The national pride, the easily summoned passion for the icons and history, your genuine love of Scotland, wonÕt be enough. This is the moment of truth for every Scot. How much do you believe in Scotland, even at cost to yourself? If the answer is: Not enough to accord it the rightful status of every other country, then vote No. Vote for Britain. But remember that the next time a blue jersey or a pipe band or a nostalgic journey home or a Hebridean ferry stirs that familiar deep feeling in your heart.You, alone among the Scots over 300 years, had the chance in your hands to do for Scotland what generations in the past gave their lives for and you said NoÉ.http://drderekbateman.wordpress.com/
  • WELL SAID, DEREK BATEMAN!I will be marching with a group of like-minded invididuals behind the bannerFOR FOLKS SAKE, VOTE YES!
  • So in terms of identity, that decision makes you a Brit first and a Scot secondNow where have I heard that kind of thing before? Rhodesia? South Africa? Berlin back when....
  • Here are two young people ( a no and an yes) talking about independence on the Radio 5 live debate: The yes girl is 15 year old Saffron Dickson.http://nationalcollective.com/2013/09/18/saffron-d ickson-scotland-needs-fresh-and-new-ideas/
  • Twelve more months of this nonsense!
  • Neil Owens and JAJ suggest that there is a strategy in place to decide in advance how many people will be marching. I am sure they are wrong - there will almost certainly be two strategies, as Unionists will be quoting police estimates to show how few people attended and therefore how unpopular the Independence cause is. From personal experience, I know that these police estimates are generally substantially below the real figure - I have been on quite a few marches, and I can count too! (As can a number of current and retired pals in the police, who have been known to share my puzzlement).As for the Twelve more months of this nonsense! brigade - you dont have to read it; you are mature adults who can opt out of doing anything you dont like. I and many others are still trying to find out as much as possible from a range of sources to inform our eventual vote, and the more thoughtful and considered contributions from this forum have been interesting and informative, on both sides of the debate. Keep them coming, I say!
  • Here are some of the speeches from the rally:Elaine C Smith (her speech starts 4:22 mins in)
  • Dennis Canavan
  • Blair Jenkins
  • Allan Grogan (Labour For Independence)
  • Margo McDonald
  • Nicola Sturgeon
  • Alex Salmond
  • 8k or 30K........What does it matter? Just as many go to T in the park!The referendum will be decided by ordinary voters. Not just by the converted.
  • The referendum will be decided by voters - period. One of my pet hates this - the ordinary people.
  • Aye, the ordinary bit almost sounds like no true Scotsman...
  • Carolyn Leckie (Women For Independence)
  • The Poet Alan BissettVote Britain
  • Elizabeth,Most of those speakers were boring, with the same old stuff and I thought Nicola Sturgeon and Alan Bissett were the worst. Alex was his same old self and I didnt think his speech was very inspiring eitherI thought Margo McDonald and Blair Jenkins came over very well and so, I would have to give them my vote. Were you there?
  • Heres a wee video that captures the spirit of the day:
  • Thanks, Elizabeth.At least, I can now see that there was nowhere near 30,000 people on Calton Hill.
  • Ahhh JAJ ! Ye werenae there. I can assure ye there were many thousands. All shapes, sizes, ages happily, peacefully coming together in the belief that a vote for independence next year could make Scotland a better place for themselves and their families. If youve got a wee bit time tae spare you could maybe count them for yourself - heres a wee film of just the march as it rounded the corner into the North Bridge Our day oot certainly was an improvement on tuning intae the Labour Party Conference at Eastbourne and hearing Johann Lamont describe a large section of the voting public in Scotland as a virus. Or Margaret Curran saying she has serious doubts over whether the Scottish Parliament has improved the education system or NHS north of the Border. Makes ye wonder just what they have planned for the Scottish Parliament in the event of a No vote!
Sign In or Register to comment.